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# Thursday, 04 October 2007

I've been writing some AJAX code recently, and while the ASP.Net AJAX Extensions have helped make things easier a great deal, when it comes to a point where I need to do something advanced and extremely funky I have to write code to manipulate the document directly.

And that's when the nightmare starts... writing DOM manipulation code is like a roller coaster, you get the feature running in IE you mood is high, then you test it in Firefox and you find out you used functions which don't work in Firefox and you come crashing down to earth. Then you get code that works in Firefox, but has problems with IE.

Eventually you figure out what works and what doesn't and your JS file is just filled with IF statements ensuring that the proper code is executed for each specific browser.

I'm just lucky we didn't promise Safari or Opera support!


Thursday, 04 October 2007 16:55:56 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Comments [0]  | 
# Sunday, 06 May 2007
Ahhh.. how far we've come now in application developement. Things used to be so easy when I started delving into programming, back then an application was just a program that just ran on your computer and that was it, hmmm and if I started work back then I guess it be a lot of database applications since that was when everything started being digitized. After the announcement of Silverlight recently I think I'll now use this post to reflect on the different methods/types of application developement that are now available.. from a MS technology based perspective of course since that's what I'm most experienced in.

Sunday, 06 May 2007 23:56:26 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Comments [0]  | 
# Sunday, 11 March 2007

AJAX is the current in thing to do with interactive webpages, there's no lack of free frameworks available out there for achieving AJAX functionality in your webpages. Typically an AJAX framework will help you easily map out and call a function on your server side pages so you can do a query to a DB, perform an action, and then return the results to the client browser without incurring a post back.

The problem was.. AFTER you got the results back, how are you going to update the page? In order to present the results you had to be pretty well versed in manipulating the HTML DOM to rebuild say.. a table of query results, and that was the usual stumbling block when someone wanted to implement AJAX functionality on their webpages.

Then Microsoft released the ASP.Net 2.0 AJAX Extensions, which used a very neat *trick* to solve the update problem. With the AJAX Extensions installed, you first code everything JUST AS YOU WOULD NORMALLY and this is important, for the most part you don't need to change a thing on how you code. Then you identify which controls require to be dynamically updated and put them into a container control called the UpdatePanel and like magic, the control now updates without a post back!

And what I find to be the coolest feature of the Extensios toolkit? If for some reason the user disabled Javascript on their browser, or the browser doesn't support the javascript required to dynamically update your page. He can still have access to all the functions of your page because it would just post back normally instead of being dynamically updated so you don't have to worry about compatibility with lesser browsers!

Of course that's a very simple description of the magic that happens, but if you're an ASP.Net 2.0 programmer you owe it to yourself to check out the extensions TODAY! ;)


Sunday, 11 March 2007 00:33:33 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Comments [0]  | 
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